BBO Discussion Forums: Coronavirus - BBO Discussion Forums

Jump to content

  • 78 Pages +
  • « First
  • 75
  • 76
  • 77
  • 78
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Coronavirus Those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it

#1521 User is offline   Winstonm 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 16,503
  • Joined: 2005-January-08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Interests:Art, music

Posted 2021-August-31, 17:10

Accidentally responded on Ken's post so deleted and am reposting as I didn't mean this as a response to his comments.

When did we as a nation lose our shame? How is it possible that absolute nonsense is expressed as a reasonable alternative and then reported as bothsideism news? Why do we tolerate senators and congressmen and news organizations spreading and reporting nutcase garbage as if it were valid alternatives to scientific research?

This is McCarthyism II - only this time there is no shame.
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Black Lives Matter.
0

#1522 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-August-31, 17:25

View PostGilithin, on 2021-August-31, 16:39, said:

The HoR is not in the slightest representative. The extreme gerrymandering means that once you have control you only need 40% or so of the vote to keep it. The USA is more or less one Presidential election away from permanent minority government if the GOP chooses to go down that route and Dems fail to take preemptive action during this administration to prevent it.


but slightly more than the others
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1523 User is offline   cherdano 

  • 5555
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 9,415
  • Joined: 2003-September-04
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-August-31, 18:03

View PostGilithin, on 2021-August-31, 16:39, said:

The HoR is not in the slightest representative. The extreme gerrymandering means that once you have control you only need 40% or so of the vote to keep it. The USA is more or less one Presidential election away from permanent minority government ifwhen the GOP chooses to go down that route andafter Dems fail to take preemptive action during this administration to prevent it.

FYP.
The easiest way to count losers is to line up the people who talk about loser count, and count them. -Kieran Dyke
0

#1524 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-01, 18:18

Studies on long-term outcomes following hospitalisation with COVID-19 are beginning to emerge.
Here is one from the Lancet.
The main takeaway message is that the large majority of people that are hospitalised with COVID and recover do return to normal life. However, some continue to have problems.

From my personal experience, we have much less resilience once we get past the age of 60.
Repair is rarely complete, and pains niggle on for longer than they used to.

Here is the main conclusion/summary:

Quote

Most COVID-19 survivors had a good physical and functional recovery during 1-year follow-up, and had returned to their original work and life. The health status in our cohort of COVID-19 survivors at 12 months was still lower than that in the control population. Huang L.; Lancet 2021; 398: 747–58

non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1525 User is offline   johnu 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,326
  • Joined: 2008-September-10
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-September-03, 01:41

Oklahoma's ERs are so backed up with people overdosing on ivermectin, gunshot victims are having to wait to be treated

Quote

An ER doctor in Oklahoma says rural hospitals in the state are clogged up by people overdosing on ivermectin.

Dr. Jason McElyea said the bed shortage is so severe that gunshot victims have to wait their turn.

McElyea said he saw people reporting vision loss after overdosing on the horse deworming drug.


It must be nice to live in Oklahoma, right Winston :) I'll bet you've got some stories to tell.
0

#1526 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-03, 02:34

Australia is now on track to vaccinate the entire (eligible) population before the end of the year (minus a small number of people that others describe better than me).
In the meantime, Sydney is locked down tighter than a metaphor about crabs.
With delta grabbing hold of 1000+ citizens daily it's a race.
All of which highlights the stupidity and incompetence of our political ("we'll be guided by the science" - so long as we agree with it and it doesn't upset our constituents) leaders.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1527 User is offline   Winstonm 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 16,503
  • Joined: 2005-January-08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Interests:Art, music

Posted 2021-September-03, 08:28

View Postjohnu, on 2021-September-03, 01:41, said:

Oklahoma's ERs are so backed up with people overdosing on ivermectin, gunshot victims are having to wait to be treated



It must be nice to live in Oklahoma, right Winston :) I'll bet you've got some stories to tell.


Our state motto? At Least We're Not Texas!
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Black Lives Matter.
1

#1528 User is offline   johnu 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,326
  • Joined: 2008-September-10
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-September-04, 02:34

A leader of a movement touting toxic bleach as a 'miracle' COVID-19 cure has been charged following a 5-year-old boy's death

Quote

Argentinian authorities charged Andreas Kalcker with falsely promoting toxic bleach as a medical cure.

The investigation was launched after a boy, 5, died after being given the substance by his parents.

Chlorine dioxide is a type of industrial bleaching agent commonly used to treat wood products.


Honestly, I find this story hard to believe. How is this guy not a Republican congressman or a Fox Propaganda "entertainer". Is chlorine dioxide anti-vaxxers next hydroxychloroquine or ivermectin?
0

#1529 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-04, 04:23

Swallowing bleach is a surprisingly common method for attempting suicide (e.g. https://pubmed.ncbi....h.gov/16885747/).
Unfortunately, the lines between psychosis and reality are blurred because of the former thingy's recommendation.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1530 User is offline   johnu 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,326
  • Joined: 2008-September-10
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-September-16, 19:48

Bat Superpowers

There was an interesting Nova (US public tv) program about bats and why they are filled with viruses (e.g. coronaviruses) yet never seem to get sick from them. A subthread of the show was that bats live extraordinarily long lives for their size, and don't seem to age and how humans could potentially benefit from knowing why.

One theory of their virus resistance is that their resistance to viruses came about when the first early bats started to fly and their immune systems developed a resistance to causing inflammation caused by the physical exertion of flying which stressed their immune systems. In Covid, cytokine storms an uncontrollable inflammatory response from the immune system which end up harming the host.

Another theory is that because bats have such an active and strong immune system, coronaviruses that exist in bats are a kind of super strain, so when they jump species they cause a lot more damage.
0

#1531 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-17, 00:55

View Postjohnu, on 2021-September-16, 19:48, said:

Bat Superpowers

There was an interesting Nova (US public tv) program about bats and why they are filled with viruses (e.g. coronaviruses) yet never seem to get sick from them. A subthread of the show was that bats live extraordinarily long lives for their size, and don't seem to age and how humans could potentially benefit from knowing why.

One theory of their virus resistance is that their resistance to viruses came about when the first early bats started to fly and their immune systems developed a resistance to causing inflammation caused by the physical exertion of flying which stressed their immune systems. In Covid, cytokine storms an uncontrollable inflammatory response from the immune system which end up harming the host.

Another theory is that because bats have such an active and strong immune system, coronaviruses that exist in bats are a kind of super strain, so when they jump species they cause a lot more damage.


Bats have a relatively low average heart rate - especially when hibernating (obviously).

Longevity is inversely related to heart rate; Across (but not within) species.
The blue-throated hummingbird doesn't stand a chance.

We can draw a straight line from human destruction of the climate to the reduction of habitat to the intermingling of species to the admixture of viral reservoirs that don't usually see humans.

non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1532 User is offline   pescetom 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,637
  • Joined: 2014-February-18
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy

Posted 2021-September-17, 08:58

View Postpilowsky, on 2021-September-17, 00:55, said:


Bats have a relatively low average heart rate - especially when hibernating (obviously).

Longevity is inversely related to heart rate; Across (but not within) species.
The blue-throated hummingbird doesn't stand a chance.


This paper seems to conclude that across species, longevity is more about scale than heart rate; fast beating chickens live almost as long as slow beating big dogs (and reach the same lifetime total of beats as a human).
Unfortunately it doesn't include data for bats. Fascinating to learn about giraffe blood pressure and why, though B-)
0

#1533 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-19, 17:58

In February 2020 - that was a long time ago - Anthony Fauci and Robert Redfield penned an Editorial for the New England Journal of Medicine.
You can read it here.

Fauci, Lane & Redfield said:

This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.

non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1534 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-September-26, 04:07

A lot of heat is being generated over the Ivermectin story.
It seems that anything that has anything to do with COVID19 now takes on a political flavour.
Yes. Getting vaccinated is the number one thing to do.
Politicising the development of medications for people that get the disease is bad.

Here is a reference to an article entitled "Ivermectin as a potential treatment for COVID-19?"
The authors (actual experts) point out several critical inadequacies in the RCT recently conducted.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1535 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-October-12, 03:17

This year the Nobel prize for economics (some would argue an oxymoron) went to Card (Canada) for "Empirical contributions to labour economics" and to Angrist (USA) and Imbens (Netherlands) for "Methodological contributions to the analysis of causal relationships". All three now work in the USA.
The idea is that natural experiments are everywhere (Card), and careful observation allows one to infer causal relationships when examining the data appropriately (Angrist and Imbens).
Natural experiments have been around for a very long time. I think that it was the development of the mathematical modelling that was so exciting to the Nobel committee.
This award led me to wonder what we can infer from uptake rates of the vaccine in countries where it is freely available.
I don't know enough about the methodology, but I see that the literature is already pretty rich in this kind of work.
Here are two commentaries in Circulation (a very highly ranked journal in the field of cardiology):https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.048671 and https://www.ahajourn...AHA.120.047538.

Uptake of COVID vaccination in Australia seems to be reaching a plateau at about 90-92% of people aged 16 and over.
Many factors can be considered important when comparing these data to underdeveloped 2nd world countries such as Florida where the uptake rate for vaccination seems a little lower.
One could argue that the concept of 'mateship' which is deeply embedded in Australian culture has led to our excellent uptake despite the efforts of the Murdoch press here to **** us up, and despite the ingrained contempt for the government (and pretty reasonable it is too), Australians have a well-developed sense of helping their mates (other Australians).
Even so, there does seem to be a population of about 5-10% who are as silly as a wheel. Nothing will convince them not to die.
I've met many of them; reality is just not their thing.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

#1536 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 6,039
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2021-November-12, 07:28

Good take on the endgame for covid from Bob Wachter via David Leonhardt at NYT:

https://messaging-cu...896ed87b2d9c72a
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#1537 User is offline   Gilithin 

  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 358
  • Joined: 2014-November-13
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-November-12, 07:55

View Postpilowsky, on 2021-October-12, 03:17, said:

Even so, there does seem to be a population of about 5-10% who are as silly as a wheel. Nothing will convince them not to die.
I've met many of them; reality is just not their thing.

Valar morghulis.
0

#1538 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 6,039
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2021-November-13, 08:16

From Covid-19 is likely to fade away in 2022 by Edward Carr, Deputy Editor, The Economist:

Quote

Pandemics do not die—they fade away. And that is what covid-19 is likely to do in 2022. True, there will be local and seasonal flare-ups, especially in chronically undervaccinated countries. Epidemiologists will also need to watch out for new variants that might be capable of outflanking the immunity provided by vaccines. Even so, over the coming years, as covid settles into its fate as an endemic disease, like flu or the common cold, life in most of the world is likely to return to normal—at least, the post-pandemic normal.

Behind this prospect lie both a stunning success and a depressing failure. The success is that very large numbers of people have been vaccinated and that, at each stage of infection from mild symptoms to intensive care, new medicines can now greatly reduce the risk of death.

Quote

Covid is not done yet. But by 2023, it will no longer be a life-threatening disease for most people in the developed world. It will still pose a deadly danger to billions in the poor world. But the same is, sadly, true of many other conditions. Covid will be well on the way to becoming just another disease.

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#1539 User is offline   cherdano 

  • 5555
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 9,415
  • Joined: 2003-September-04
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2021-November-14, 17:25

View Posty66, on 2021-November-12, 07:28, said:

Good take on the endgame for covid from Bob Wachter via David Leonhardt at NYT:

https://messaging-cu...896ed87b2d9c72a

Uhm.

Dr. Angela Rasmussen @angie_rasmussen said:

Which precautions should stay and which should go?

Many experts have many opinions on this, but you should know that David Leonhardt is not one of them. Actual experts/responsible journalists don’t cherry-pick quotes & data to justify the conclusion they want to be true.

Note that Bob Wachter also felt the need to clarify his quotes - https://twitter.com/...198230994980870

The timing of this article is particularly Leonhardtish. With its slow booster uptake, the next US wave is certainly coming. If you live in the US and want covid to be over, the best thing to do is to stop reading Leonhardt and instead urge all your friends and relatives who are eligible to get a booster. Anyone over 65, anyone with health conditions (quite broad), anyone working in a "high risk" (healthcare, schools) setting is eligible if they've been fully vaccinated for 6 months.
The easiest way to count losers is to line up the people who talk about loser count, and count them. -Kieran Dyke
1

#1540 User is offline   pilowsky 

  • pilowsky
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,531
  • Joined: 2019-October-04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Writing, Learning, History, Politics

Posted 2021-November-14, 17:42

RonDeSecrateUs said:

NO VAX NO VOTE


In a shock move yesterday the Governor has decided that only fully vaccinated individuals will be allowed to vote.

The Governor said that too many unidentified people are entering our polling stations.

"To prevent these people from casting illegal ballots, I am today signing into law a bill that requires all voters to identify themselves by showing proof of vaccination. "




non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek, J'ai toujours misé sur l'étrange gentillesse des robots.
0

Share this topic:


  • 78 Pages +
  • « First
  • 75
  • 76
  • 77
  • 78
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

2 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users