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RIP Memoriam thread?

#741 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2020-July-19, 09:05

John Lewis

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John Robert Lewis grew up with all the humiliations imposed by segregated rural Alabama. He was born on Feb. 21, 1940, to Eddie and Willie Mae (Carter) Lewis near the town of Troy on a sharecropping farm owned by a white man. After his parents bought their own farm — 110 acres for $300 — John, the third of 10 children, shared in the farm work, leaving school at harvest time to pick cotton, peanuts and corn. Their house had no plumbing or electricity. In the outhouse, they used the pages of an old Sears catalog as toilet paper.

John was responsible for taking care of the chickens. He fed them and read to them from the Bible. He baptized them when they were born and staged elaborate funerals when they died.

“I was truly intent on saving the little birds’ souls,” he wrote in his memoir, “Walking With the Wind” (1998). “I could imagine that they were my congregation. And me, I was a preacher.”

His family called him “Preacher,” and becoming one seemed to be his destiny. He drew inspiration by listening to a young minister named Martin Luther King on the radio and reading about the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott. He finally wrote a letter to Dr. King, who sent him a round-trip bus ticket to visit him in Montgomery, in 1958.

By then, Mr. Lewis had begun his studies at American Baptist Theological Seminary (now American Baptist College) in Nashville, where he worked as a dishwasher and janitor to pay for his education.

In Nashville, Mr. Lewis met many of the civil rights activists who would stage the lunch counter sit-ins, Freedom Rides and voter registration campaigns. They included the Rev. James M. Lawson Jr., who was one of the nation’s most prominent scholars of civil disobedience and who led workshops on Gandhi and nonviolence. He mentored a generation of civil rights organizers, including Mr. Lewis.

Mr. Lewis’s first arrest came in February 1960, when he and other students demanded service at whites-only lunch counters in Nashville. It was the first prolonged battle of the movement that evolved into the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

David Halberstam, then a reporter for The Nashville Tennessean, later described the scene: “The protests had been conducted with exceptional dignity, and gradually one image had come to prevail — that of elegant, courteous young Black people, holding to their Gandhian principles, seeking the most elemental of rights, while being assaulted by young white hoodlums who beat them up and on occasion extinguished cigarettes on their bodies.”

In three months, after repeated well-publicized sit-ins, the city’s political and business communities gave in to the pressure, and Nashville became the first major Southern city to begin desegregating public facilities.

But Mr. Lewis lost his family’s good will. When his parents learned that he had been arrested in Nashville, he wrote, they were ashamed. They had taught him as a child to accept the world as he found it. When he asked them about signs saying “Colored Only,” they told him, “That’s the way it is, don’t get in trouble.”

But as an adult, he said, after he met Dr. King and Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man was a flash point for the civil rights movement, he was inspired to “get into trouble, good trouble, necessary trouble.”

Getting into “good trouble” became his motto for life. A documentary film, “John Lewis: Good Trouble,” was released this month.

Despite the disgrace he had brought on his family, he felt that he had been “involved in a holy crusade” and that getting arrested had been “a badge of honor,” he said in a 1979 oral history interview housed at Washington University in St. Louis.

In 1961, when he graduated from the seminary, he joined a Freedom Ride organized by the Congress of Racial Equality, known as CORE. He and others were beaten bloody when they tried to enter a whites-only waiting room at the bus station in Rock Hill, S.C. Later, he was jailed in Birmingham, Ala., and beaten again in Montgomery, where several others were badly injured and one was paralyzed for life.

“If there was anything I learned on that long, bloody bus trip of 1961,” he wrote in his memoir, “it was this — that we were in for a long, bloody fight here in the American South. And I intended to stay in the middle of it.”

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#742 User is offline   gwnn 

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Posted 2020-August-19, 13:37

Justin Lall, my #1 bridge hero and BBF's GOAT for all eternity (all his usernames).
... and I can prove it with my usual, flawless logic.
      George Carlin
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#743 User is offline   shyams 

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Posted 2020-August-19, 14:24

View Postgwnn, on 2020-August-19, 13:37, said:

Justin Lall, my #1 bridge hero and BBF's GOAT for all eternity (all his usernames).

I am stunned and truly saddened to read about this. I never met him in-person but I used to read his blogs and posts very diligently. I also used to occasionally get to play against him when BBF used to have those Sunday individuals.

Oh, this is tragic. My heartfelt condolences to all who were dear to him.
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#744 User is offline   hrothgar 

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Posted 2020-August-19, 14:37

View Postgwnn, on 2020-August-19, 13:37, said:

Justin Lall, my #1 bridge hero and BBF's GOAT for all eternity (all his usernames).


Say what?

I only meet him a few times, but he was a great guy.

I HATE 2020
Alderaan delenda est
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#745 User is online   Winstonm 

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Posted 2020-August-19, 15:37

I remember Justin playing when he was around 12 years old, and I often played against his brilliant father, Hemant Lall. Justin was one of the most pleasant persons I ever met. So sad and such a shock.
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Black Lives Matter.
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#746 User is offline   Phil 

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Posted 2020-August-20, 20:59

Seemed appropriate I come over and pay my respects.

I wrote a few stories on BridgeWinners - hopefully you got to read them.

We moved to Dallas a few years ago. Never, ever bumped into him but know Hemant and his SO very well. A few of Justin's friends came into town earlier this week.

I ordered them Chuy's last night. That was Justin's favorite Tex-Mex.

Never check this so if you want to say hi, PM me on Bridgewinners or BBO.
Hi y'all!

Winner - BBO Challenge bracket #6 - February, 2017.
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#747 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2020-August-20, 21:52

I enjoyed the hilarious stories about jlall by jdonn, clee and others at bridgewinners. Good job trying to lift everyone's spirits on what has been the saddest day in the history of this forum for me. What an incredible human being we have lost.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#748 User is offline   barmar 

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Posted 2020-August-21, 09:48

There's a thread in the General Bridge Forum about Justin

https://www.bridgeba...ustin-lall-rip/

Since this is a bridge-related death, let's continue to use that one.

#749 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2020-August-31, 06:40

Larry Pardey, Mariner Who Sailed the World Engineless, Dies at 80

Posted ImageMr. Pardey in 1982 building his 29-foot boat, Taleisin, an engineless wooden yacht.Credit...Lin Pardey

Quote

Life aboard their boats, first the 24-foot Seraffyn, then the Taleisin, was simple. They had a compass, a sextant and a radio transmitter but used no GPS. systems, and no engines.The lack of complexity suited Mr. Pardey’s facility for navigation and reduced their costs.

“When we first set off, we could live in Mexico for $200 a month,” he told The New York Times in 2000. “The way we looked at it, a $3,000 engine cost 14 months of freedom. We never dreamed of going cruising and being comfortable, we just dreamed of going.”

They fulfilled that dream many times over. Their first circumnavigation, starting in 1968 on an eastward route, spanned 11 years and took them to 47 countries. Beginning in 1984, they spent 25 years traveling west on their second circumnavigation, touching land in 30 more countries.

Their final big voyage in 2009 took them from Southern California to New Zealand, via the Line Islands and Tonga, where they met a goddaughter named Linlarry.

“Although he was aware of his diminishing physical abilities, he attributed this all to normal aging, saying, ‘What do you expect after you’ve used your body so hard for 70 years?’” Ms. Pardey said of her husband. “‘Boats wear out. So do people!’”

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#750 User is online   kenberg 

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Posted 2020-August-31, 10:13

That is one terrific article about the Pardeys. At first I was wondering how Ms. Pardey felt about all of tihs nut then I got to:

"He was soon skippering a ketch and, in May 1965, meeting his future wife, Lin Zatkin, in a bar. She was working at the time in the corporate office of the Bob's Big Boy restaurant chain in Pasadena but craving adventure, Ms. Pardey said. Sailing, she felt, would satisfy her wanderlust.

Three days after they met, they were together for good."

Ok, that explains that!

Congratulations to them both. Maybe "congratulations" is a strange comment at the end of life, but here it seems just right.
Ken
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#751 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2020-September-10, 09:47

Posted Image
Diana Rigg, Emma Peel of The Avengers'
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#752 User is online   Winstonm 

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Posted 2020-September-10, 15:05

Not Emma Peel!
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Black Lives Matter.
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#753 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2020-September-19, 09:08

From Maira Kalman's 2009 visit to the Supreme Court

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#754 User is offline   paulg 

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Posted 2020-September-23, 10:04

Elena Jeronimidis was a good friend known to the UK bridge community but probably not well known internationally. She was a good player, playing trials for the England Women's team, but was known best for being the editor of Bridge Plus and English Bridge. She also edited one book, the Bedside book of bridge, with articles from many of her friends well-known bridge players.

I met her first in the mid 1980s when I moved to Reading. As well as being one of the few who generally spelt her name correctly and taking her husband off her hands to play bridge, we always got on well.

Perhaps of more relevance to the BBO Forums, Elena was the first editor to publish Justin Lall's articles.

Her biography can be found on https://www.ebu.co.u...ena-jeronimidis

Condolences to her husband Giorgio, her sons Andrew and David and their families.

RIP
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#755 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2020-October-06, 16:00

Another voice of my youth gone https://www.bbc.co.u...t-arts-54443394
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#756 User is offline   PassedOut 

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Posted 2020-October-06, 20:09

View PostCyberyeti, on 2020-October-06, 16:00, said:

Another voice of my youth gone https://www.bbc.co.u...t-arts-54443394

A couple of years after Constance and I had started our family, we bought a camper van. I suggested that we name it Morrison, but she objected immediately. "No way, it's got to be Halen!"
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#757 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2020-October-07, 03:17

And another https://www.youtube....h?v=NkwJ-g0iJ6w
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#758 User is offline   thepossum 

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Posted 2020-October-07, 04:06

View PostCyberyeti, on 2020-October-07, 03:17, said:



Very much a sound of my childhood :)
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#759 User is offline   thepossum 

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Posted 2020-October-07, 04:08

View PostCyberyeti, on 2020-October-06, 16:00, said:

Another voice of my youth gone https://www.bbc.co.u...t-arts-54443394


I do like a piece of father-to-son advice Eddie regaled in an interview. Paraphrasing - if you make a mistake do it again but smile so people think you did it
intentionally.

Definitely an important sound of my youth without really knowing much or folloiwng him or the band as a fan so to speak ... and actually such a huge part of the sound of my youth I'm ashamed I only found some of it out today
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#760 User is offline   nige1 

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Posted 2020-October-10, 06:06

BLML (Bridge Laws Mailing List)
Active since 1996, thanks to Henk Uijterwaal. He will have to close it 1 Nov 2020.
I have fond memories of Bill (Kojak) Schoder deriding law-change suggestions as BS.
I hope members will start posting on BBF



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